Updates again? (or The Times They Are Still A-Changin’)

This was written in response to a question I got about why I am so vigilant about keeping the latest versions of everything at my disposal. For some folks, it seems logical. But other folks maintain an attitude of “what I’ve got is working, so why should I update it.” I can understand that point of view, but for what I do, I don’t have that luxury. Here’s why….

Every few weeks, it seems like Facebook or Twitter or Google or Instagram or (insert favorite web-based service here) unveils a new interface update or some new functionality. Every few weeks, two of my desktop web browsers install brand new versions of themselves onto my machines.

These updates can cause headaches for some users, but overall, these adjustments are merely minor inconveniences to which users will adjust in relatively short order. So why do software companies do that? Why don’t they just release a new version every year or two with all the major updates rolled into one fantastic new thingie?

The fact is that annual major releases are becoming a thing of the past, and the web is a much better place because of it. Back in the dark ages, when Internet speeds for most users were limited to 56.6kb/s, the idea of hundreds of thousands of users downloading and installing software updates was absurd. The servers would crash! The Internet would implode. Productivity would screech to a halt! And the fact is, these things are probably true. Distributing software via the Internet was a slow process way back then, and most companies chose to produce and distribute physical media instead of making updates available online.

Welcome to the new world, and it’s this new world that is causing such problems for dinosaurs like Microsoft. Yes, I just called Microsoft a dinosaur. Microsoft releases updates to Internet Explorer once every year or so, and each time the new version is released, we coding geeks know that our lives will be turned upside down trying to make sure our materials are compatible with Redmond’s latest output. But over the past few years, Internet Explorer has seen its share of users steadily declining while more flexible browsers like Google Chrome have seen an explosion of users. Why? Simple. Chrome meets users’ needs while the needs are still fresh. Internet Explorer does not.

We live in a fast-paced society, and what was the latest big thing yesterday is old hat today. Whether or not I agree with that philosophy is of no consequence. The facts are that our systems and processes must be flexible if they are to keep up. The tools we use are no longer one-size fits all, and the businesses that recognize this and adjust their practices accordingly are the businesses that will survive. The dinosaurs were replaced by faster, smarter, more adaptable forms of life. Businesses are no different.

But this is an instructional technology blog written by an instructional technology geek, why should that matter here?

The world of education is in the midst of a dramatic shift unlike anything that we have seen since the introduction of the printing press. Our students know this. Veterans of the industry know this. Even relative newcomers (like myself) are hip to this fact. The procedures we set in place today will set the precedent and determine the future of our organizations for years to come. If we fail to recognize the critical importance of this shift and strive to stay at the forefront, our institutions will suffer. Enrollments will drop as students opt for faster, smarter, more adaptable forms of education. Institutions will merge or close, and students who are already at the greatest disadvantage will fall further behind and their shot at the “American Dream” will evaporate.

So please, update your browser.

~R

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